Porter Cable PCE605K52 3-Amp Oscillating Multi-Tool Kit

Do you ever wonder how much the internet knows about you? I wonder this all the time!

Earlier this week Amazon’s Deal of the Day was a garbage disposal for about $30 less than Home Depot or Lowes. Today I check the deal of the day and it is this Porter Cable PCE605K52 3-Amp Oscillating Multi-Tool Kit which includes 52 accessories.

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Clearly I’m spending too much time looking for tools/ fixtures online lately!

My dad has something similar (cordless) and we’ve used it for almost every project in the house! So if you are looking to remodel you can grab this Porter Cable PCE605K52 3-Amp Oscillating Multi-Tool Kit for just under $80.

I’ve been working on the bathrooms this weekend. I’m almost finished with the master bath vanity. I had a revelation while I was painting it yesterday and I can’t wait to share my new bathroom plan with you.

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How to Make a Thankful Tree

By contributing writer Jordon

Thanksgiving is this month and we decided to do something different this year. We decided to create a Thankful Tree and write something we are thankful for each day.   Now, a thankful tree is nothing new, and I am sure you have seen many different ones floating around on Pinterest, but this is our version, and I love the idea of what it brings to our family.

How to Make a Thankful Tree at The Happy Housewife

There is so much to be thankful for, and there is something about writing it down and looking at it every day that makes it that much more real. Not to mention the cuteness it brings to the room! I love the idea of keeping our leaves from each year in a little box so we can look back at different years, remembering what we were thankful for at that time.  I encourage you to make your own Thankful Tree. “It’s not happy people who are thankful, it is thankful people who are happy.”

How to Make a Thankful Tree

First off, when making a thankful tree, anything can really work because it is your tree.  I thought about using real branches, but I loved the idea of using lighted branches (I already had them) to warm the tree up and light it at night!  Get creative with the stuff you have on hand.  Most of this stuff I already had!

How to Make a Thankful Tree (Supplies) at The Happy Housewife

Supplies Needed

Instructions

1. Place the pine cones in the Mason jar to be the base of the tree.

2. Wrap the copper wire around the Mason jar to add decoration.

How to Make a Thankful Tree (step 2) at The Happy Housewife

3. Use a leaf punch or stencil to cut leaves from the paper. This paper had the cutest fall colors and designs and I desperately wanted it for my leaves! :) Purchasing the leaf punch was for my sanity. It was a life saver and inexpensive.  It made the cutest little leaves!

How to Make a Thankful Tree (step 3) at The Happy Housewife

Be sure to make a lot of leaves so each day you and your family can add to your thankful tree!

How to Make a Thankful Tree (step 3) at The Happy Housewife

4. Punch holes in leaves for the jute string to go through to hang them. How to Make a Thankful Tree (step 4) at The Happy Housewife

Here’s to being thankful for all the wonderful blessings God has given us! I guess you could also call this a Blessings Tree! This is a new tradition for our family and I hope this post will encourage you to add a new thankful tradition.  I would love to see your Thankful Trees!

This is why I wanted to use the lighted branches. Isn’t it pretty?!

How to Make a Thankful Tree at The Happy Housewife

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Bench Makeover

Bench Makeover at The Happy Housewife

By contributing writer Jordon

A friend of mine had this old bench she was just going to throw away.  It had definitely seen better days! However, I saw a diamond in the rough and decided to save it.  Not to mention that it would give me some extra storage (who couldn’t use that).  My closet is on the smaller side, so it is a jammed packed mess (I have a shopping problem). So trying to fit every season of clothing in there is difficult.  I thought this bench would be perfect to store some of my out of season clothes, and it would go perfectly at the end of my bed.  This bench definitely belonged with me, so I loaded it up and took it home to give it a makeover.

For this bench makeover, I decided to paint the bench an antique white to match my bedroom furniture.  I already had all the supplies from when I gave those pieces makeovers.  What I used was actually a Rust-Oleum Cabinet Kit.  It has almost everything you need, and I used the same kit to do four different pieces! Definitely a good bang for your buck! You can get the kit at any home store or on Amazon.  Here is a picture of it:

Bench Makeover at The Happy Housewife

But, you can definitely do the makeover with out the kit!

Supplies Needed

  • Paint of choice
  • Fabric to reupholster (premeasured for bench)
  • 150 grit sandpaper
  • Terry cloth
  • Old hand towel
  • Cheese cloth (for the antique glaze)
  • Polyurethane
  • 2 Paint brushes (one for paint & one for poly)
  • Spray paint for the hinges
  • Latex gloves for the gloss if you choose to do that
  • Staple gun
  • Screw driver

Instructions

1. Put down drip protection.  I put an old sheet down and my sawhorses on top to lay the boards across.  You can use an old table, cardboard on the ground, or anything else you can think of.  Just know the stain might drip, so you want to be cautious of that.

2. If there are any big holes or scratches you want to fill in, now is the time to do it (unless you want to keep them for more of an antique look).  Just get some wood filler that can be stained or painted over and fill in the holes.  Using a putty knife, smooth it over, but not completely flush to the surface.  Let it dry, then remove the top of the bench by unscrewing the hinges and lightly sand every inch of both pieces of wood, including the filled in holes, corners and edges.  

Remember to sand with the grain of the wood.  Take a piece of your sandpaper and fold it in half and then fold it in half again.  This makes it easier to sand, and you can use all sides (you may have to refold to get to the fresh part). 

3. Use the terry cloth to wipe off excess sand dust on the pieces.

4. Begin adding your paint color.   I did 3 coats of the white paint.  Let the paint dry between each coat.

5. Glaze, if you want an antique look. You will need gloves, cheese cloth and glaze. Dab your cheese cloth in the glaze and begin gently rubbing it onto your bench.  You need to go in small sections so the glaze does not over color your paint.  Make sure to get the glaze in the cracks and crevasses of the bench.  That will show more of the antique look.

Next, take your hand towel and gently rub off the glaze.  Rub it off until you get the look you are wanting. Continue in small sections until you get the whole bench finished. If you feel you let the glaze sit on there too long or it is not looking like how you want it, simply repaint over the glaze and start over.

Bench Makeover at The Happy Housewife

6. As the glaze is drying, you can spray paint your hinges (or other hardware).  Spray paint can make old rusty hardware look brand new.  It is awesome!  You can also buy new hinges and hardware, but you may have to drill new holes for them.

7. After the glaze has dried, you can put on the polyurethane.  I put two coats on mine.

8. Once poly is dry, you can take the top of the bench and begin reupholstering it.  Lay your fabric out and set your top in the middle (I like to have about 4 or 5 inches on each side).

Put the fabric over the holes for the hinges.  Take your screw and screw through the fabric into the holes so you know where they are. You can use a screw driver for this, but my husband wanted an excuse to use his drill. ;)

Bench Makeover at The Happy Housewife

Bench Makeover at The Happy Housewife

Next, start stapling your fabric to the bench top.  When you get to the edges, think of folding them up like a Christmas present, so the edges look nice.  Then staple them like that.

8. Attach the hinges and then attach the top to the bench.

And that is it! You just gave your bench a makeover!

Bench Makeover at The Happy Housewife

Mine has given me much needed storage for clothes!  I can put all of my summer clothes in here and organize my closet for the colder months, and my summer clothes are still easily accessible in case we decide to go some place warm this winter! :)

Bench Makeover at The Happy Housewife

Here is one of the dressers that matches the bench.

Bench Makeover at The Happy Housewife

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How to Make a Growth Chart Ruler

How to Make a Growth Chart Ruler | The Happy Housewife

By contributing writer Jordon

We have moved a lot for my husband’s job, so the few times I would mark the growth of my boys on the wall of our house, I would end up painting over it before we moved out. :(  My records of their growth came from the pediatricians office whenever they were seen, and I would write it down (when I remembered) in their books.

Yes, I have the record of their growing little bodies, but it is not much fun for them when they cannot see their previous height and compare it to their current height to see how much they have grown themselves.  Well, now they can. And we can take their rulers to any house and have a permanent keepsake for all those years of growth.  How exciting!  Not to mention, the rulers really do look cool in their rooms!

So, you want to make one too?!

How to Make a Growth Chart Ruler

How to Make a Growth Chart Ruler (supplies)| The Happy Housewife

Supplies Needed

Remember, I made two, so you would only need one board.

Instructions

1. Put down drip protection.  I put an old sheet down and my sawhorses on top to lay the boards across.  You can use an old table, cardboard on the ground, or anything else you can think of.  Just know the stain might drip, so you want to be cautious of that.

2. Lightly sand every inch of your piece of wood, including corners and edges.  Take a piece of your sandpaper and fold it in half and then fold it in half again.  This makes it easier to sand, and you can use all sides (you may have to refold to get to the fresh part).

How to Make a Growth Chart Ruler (sand paper)| The Happy Housewife

Why is it important to sand before you stain or paint?  Wood is a relatively soft, porous material, which is why we are able to change its color by applying a penetrating stain or a dye. But since it is soft, it can be scratched and dented between the time it leaves the sawmill and reaches our garage or basement workshop.

These dents and scratches actually absorb more stain than does unblemished wood, so unless we sand them out, these dents and scratches will appear even worse after staining. In addition, the final milling process often crushes the top layer of pores in the board, making it more difficult for our stain to penetrate the wood. A light sanding will open the pores so that we can achieve the color we want.

3.  After you have finished sanding, grab your tack cloth. Wipe the folded tack cloth across the wood to remove dust. As each side of the cloth becomes saturated with dust, refold to expose a fresh surface.

Inexpensive tack cloths are available at hardware stores, or you can make your own by soaking a 12 inch piece of cheesecloth in a small amount of tung oil. Store tack cloths in a sealed plastic bag to prevent them from drying out between uses.

4. Stain the wood.  Pour about 1/4 cup of stain into your bowl (you will have to fill up a few more times).  Dab your brush in it and move with the grain, not against it. The longer you leave the stain on, the darker the finish. I used 3 coats.

5.  Make measuring marks. Most homes have baseboards, so depending on the height of yours, you adjust your first foot.  For example: I have 7  3/4 inch baseboards, so I started my ruler at the 8 inch mark, then I had only 4 inches until my 1st foot.

Mark the lines with pencil.  You will have 11 lines in between each foot, the 12th line being the next foot.  Each one is an inch apart.  Lines 3 and 9 of each foot I made 2 inches long.  Line 6 on each foot (half inch) I made 3 inches long.  Each foot line I made 4 inches long and the smaller lines in between them all were 1 inch long.

How to Make a Growth Chart Ruler (marking lines)| The Happy Housewife

After all the lines are made, go back over them with a black paint pen. Then stencil in each number.

6. Let the paint dry and put a coat or two of polyurethane on, remember to lightly sand the ruler in between coats. Once that has dried, attach the hanger piece, and put it wherever your heart desires!

How to Make a Growth Chart Ruler (hanger)| The Happy Housewife

That’s it!  Happy Measuring! :)

How to Make a Growth Chart Ruler| The Happy Housewife

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This post may contain a link to an affiliate. See my disclosure policy for more information.