How to Your Cancel Amazon Prime Membership

Are you ready to cancel your Amazon prime membership? Perhaps you don’t shop on Amazon as much as you thought and aren’t taking advantage of the benefits of Amazon Prime membership.

Maybe you signed up for the free trial and now have buyer’s remorse. It’s simple to cancel your Amazon Prime membership and if you are still in your free trial you will pay nothing.

How to Cancel Your Amazon Prime Membership

Cancel your free trial membership

If you still in your free trial period, click here to manage your trial membership. You can cancel your Amazon Prime free trial membership by clicking on the link that says “Do not continue.” As long as you cancel your Prime membership within 30 days you will not be charged anything, no matter what benefits you use.

Cancel an active Prime Membership

If you have already paid for the Amazon Prime membership (maybe you forgot to cancel during your free trial period) you can still cancel and get a full refund, IF you have not used any of the Amazon Prime benefits. 

According to Amazon, if you are eligible for a refund you will receive it within 3-5 business days. I recommend setting up a calendar reminder to make sure you get your refund in a timely manner.

You can cancel your membership at any time, however you will not be refunded any money if you or anyone in your household has used your Prime benefits.

how to cancel amazon prime membership

If you currently have an Amazon Prime membership but aren’t using all the Amazon Prime benefits each year, set up a renewal reminder with Amazon.

Amazon will email you three days before your Prime membership renews date but you have to request it. You can request the email reminder on the Prime membership page,  just click on the blue text on the left hand side.

When Amazon sends you the renewal email you can cancel your membership and not be charged for the next year.

Cancel a Prime Membership set up by a third party

If you received an Amazon Prime Membership via a third party, you need to contact the third party to manage your membership. You cannot cancel it directly through Amazon.

Before you cancel your Amazon Prime Free Trial Membership

While I never recommend spending money on something you don’t use, I’m always surprised by home many people don’t know all the benefits of Amazon Prime.

Not only do you get free two-day shipping on millions of items on the website, you also get free photo storage, free Kindle books to read, and streaming music, television, and movies. If you want to learn more about how you can take advantage of your Amazon Prime membership check out my article on why I love it.

Amazon Prime isn’t for everyone

While I love Amazon Prime and all its benefits I realize it isn’t for everyone. If you only purchase sparingly on Amazon (like during the holidays) and don’t take advantage off all the other Prime benefits, it’s probably not worth the $10.99 a month ($99 a year).

It’s also important to note, that since I’ve been shopping on Amazon, they’ve offered some level of free shipping every December, but you have to make a minimum purchase. So, if you only do your holiday shopping on Amazon, it might make more financial sense to take advantage of their free shipping offers open to everyone and cancel your Prime membership after the free trial period.

If you signed up for a free trial of Amazon Prime, I highly recommend creating a calendar reminder for 25 days after your sign up date. This will help you remember to cancel your Prime membership and you won’t be charged any fee.

Remember when you cancel your membership to follow all the directions on the website. Amazon makes it easy to cancel, but you do go through two webpages to complete the process.  Once you have cancelled you will get a confirmation of your cancellation on the screen.

If you have already paid for Prime, but have not used any benefits, you will see a refund on your credit card statement in a few days.

 

The post How to Your Cancel Amazon Prime Membership appeared first on The Happy Housewife™ :: Frugal Living.

  

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White Chocolate Candy Cane Donuts

Are you looking for a fun and festive breakfast idea this holiday season? One of my favorite holiday traditions is donuts on Christmas Eve morning. Some years we buy donuts but when I’m feeling ambitious the kids and I make homemade donuts.

Even though purchasing donuts is easier, I think homemade donuts taste SO MUCH BETTER! Plus, you can customize them to make your favorite flavors, and for additional fun (and maybe a little stress) have the kids help with make them.

These white chocolate candy cane donuts are SO pretty you almost don’t want to eat them!

white chocolate candy cane donuts

These white chocolate candy cane donuts use box cake mix and are fairly simple to make. They do require a donut pan. but pans are inexpensive last forever. (I’ve had mine for at least 10 years!)

If you like cake donuts (my favorite) then you will love the taste of these donuts.

In this donut recipe we used Krispy Kreme cake mix, but you can use any kind or flavor of cake mix in a baked donut recipe. One of my favorite cake donuts is the double chocolate (which could be made with chocolate cake mix and chocolate candy melts – yummm). But I digress.

Empty the cake mix into a mixing bowl and follow the directions on the box to prepare the donut batter.

I like to use a hand mixer when making cakes because if I use my stand mixer I tend to forget it is running and over mix the batter.

Mix the dry and wet ingredients according to the cake box directions. Don’t over mix. Did you know that if you over mix cake batter you get a more dense, chewy-er cake? Unless you like your donuts that way, make sure you follow the directions and don’t over mix. 

Spray your donut pan with nonstick spray.

Pour the batter into the donut pan, do not overfill. I pour my batter about 2/3 of the way full.

Bake the donuts for 12 minutes at 350 degrees.

While the donuts are baking crush your candy canes and begin to prepare your candy melts. Once the donuts are cooled, dip them in the melted chocolate and add the crushed candy canes to the top of the donuts.

   Ingredients

Directions

  • Mix together the cake mix, water, oil and eggs according to the cake mix box.
  • Spray the donut pan with cooking spray.
  • Pour the donut mix into a measuring cup for easy pouring. Pour the donut mix into the donut pan.
  • Bake for 12 minutes at 350 degrees.
  • Let cool.
  • Place the candy canes into a ziploc bag and crush with a rolling pan or the bottom of a glass cup.
  • Melt the white candy melts in microwave or with this Wilton Melting Pot.
  • Dip the top of the donuts in the white melts. Before the white melts harden, sprinkle the crushed candy canes on top.

The post White Chocolate Candy Cane Donuts appeared first on The Happy Housewife™ :: Cooking.

  

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This post may contain a link to an affiliate. See my disclosure policy for more information.

White Chocolate Candy Cane Donuts

Are you looking for a fun and festive breakfast idea this holiday season? One of my favorite holiday traditions is donuts on Christmas Eve morning. Some years we buy donuts but when I’m feeling ambitious the kids and I make homemade donuts.

Even though purchasing donuts is easier, I think homemade donuts taste SO MUCH BETTER! Plus, you can customize them to make your favorite flavors, and for additional fun (and maybe a little stress) have the kids help with make them.

These white chocolate candy cane donuts are SO pretty you almost don’t want to eat them!

white chocolate candy cane donuts

These white chocolate candy cane donuts use box cake mix and are fairly simple to make. They do require a donut pan. but pans are inexpensive last forever. (I’ve had mine for at least 10 years!)

If you like cake donuts (my favorite) then you will love the taste of these donuts.

In this donut recipe we used Krispy Kreme cake mix, but you can use any kind or flavor of cake mix in a baked donut recipe. One of my favorite cake donuts is the double chocolate (which could be made with chocolate cake mix and chocolate candy melts – yummm). But I digress.

Empty the cake mix into a mixing bowl and follow the directions on the box to prepare the donut batter.

I like to use a hand mixer when making cakes because if I use my stand mixer I tend to forget it is running and over mix the batter.

Mix the dry and wet ingredients according to the cake box directions. Don’t over mix. Did you know that if you over mix cake batter you get a more dense, chewy-er cake? Unless you like your donuts that way, make sure you follow the directions and don’t over mix. 

Spray your donut pan with nonstick spray.

Pour the batter into the donut pan, do not overfill. I pour my batter about 2/3 of the way full.

Bake the donuts for 12 minutes at 350 degrees.

While the donuts are baking crush your candy canes and begin to prepare your candy melts. Once the donuts are cooled, dip them in the melted chocolate and add the crushed candy canes to the top of the donuts.

   Ingredients

Directions

  • Mix together the cake mix, water, oil and eggs according to the cake mix box.
  • Spray the donut pan with cooking spray.
  • Pour the donut mix into a measuring cup for easy pouring. Pour the donut mix into the donut pan.
  • Bake for 12 minutes at 350 degrees.
  • Let cool.
  • Place the candy canes into a ziploc bag and crush with a rolling pan or the bottom of a glass cup.
  • Melt the white candy melts in microwave or with this Wilton Melting Pot.
  • Dip the top of the donuts in the white melts. Before the white melts harden, sprinkle the crushed candy canes on top.

The post White Chocolate Candy Cane Donuts appeared first on The Happy Housewife™ :: Cooking.

  

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This post may contain a link to an affiliate. See my disclosure policy for more information.

Teaching Textbooks: Curriculum Review

My husband discovered Teaching Textbooks at a homeschool convention many years ago. Frustrated with teaching math I saw it as a way out. Before Teaching Textbooks I had used Bob Jones, Abeka, Horizons, Miquon, Rod and Staff, Life of Fred (see Life of Fred review here), and Chalkdust, Saxon.

Some might call me a homeschool math expert since I’ve used most of the curriculum published for homeschoolers, but in reality I was desperate for something that worked for my family. Except for Saxon, which sent my kids into hysterics every single day, the other programs were all good and I liked them. But I had a problem. I was homeschooling four or five kids at the time and I needed to find a subject they could do on their own, Teaching Textbooks might be the answer to my math problem. 

Teaching textbooks math curriculum review

Before Teaching Textbooks, as my children progressed through the higher levels of math they would go through the book on their own and I would check their work. Inevitably they would come to a point (usually around lesson 75) where they didn’t understand the concept being taught and I would then spend two to three hours looking through all the previous lessons to help explain the current lesson they couldn’t understand. This was frustrating for my kids and for me!

When I heard about Teaching Textbooks it seemed too good to be true. The lessons were on CD’s and for some levels everything was automated including the grade book. I was finished teaching math FOREVER!!! Or so I thought.

Over the past four years I’ve used Math 3 Math 5Math 7, Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry, and Pre-Calculus. If you are doing the math you’ll know that I’ve spent a lot of money on this curriculum.

Pros of Teaching Textbooks Math Curriculum 

Minimal Teacher Involvement: I think this is a positive because you can follow along with your child, but it is not necessary. In the four years I’ve been using this program I’ve probably spent less than 4 hours helping my kids with math. Since I was looking for a hands-off approach to math this definitely worked.

Teaching Textbook Lessons are Easy to Understand: The lessons are presented in an easy to understand way, especially at the younger levels. The teacher speaks slowly and the graphics are interesting but not overwhelming.

Favorite for Kids: My kids and many others love Teaching Textbooks. My younger boys ask to do math every day because they enjoy it. After years of crying through math lessons it is nice to have a program my kids actually like.

Computerized Grading: For all grades and math levels, Teaching Textbooks offers the entire program on CD rom and is totally automated, including automatic grading as soon as the child answers the question. The program tracks your child’s progress, lets you know which problems they missed, and even keeps a grade book. This makes record keeping for math very simple.

NonConsumable: There are no workbooks, so more than one child can use the curriculum. Even the computer programs can be reset so siblings can use them.

Excellent Customer Support: I haven’t needed customer support too often, but I’ve been impressed with their prompt responses and willingness to help.

They Sell Single Copies of the Cd’s: If you have a careless child who gets into a fight with his brother and in the process cracks a CD in half, you only need to replace one CD, not the whole set. I wouldn’t know this from experience, of course.

Cons of Teaching Textbooks Math Curriculum

Expensive: Teaching Textbooks Math 3 is $119 while Saxon Math 3 is around $60. The price goes up and in high school are close to $200, with Pre-Calculus selling for $185.00. Because Teaching Textbooks is such a popular program used sets are hard to find and the prices are still fairly high. (To their credit, the prices have stayed the same for over six years).

Fewer Review Problems: If you are familiar with Saxon (or Abeka to some extent) you know those programs incorporate a mind numbing amount of review problems. ? Teaching Textbooks offers significantly less in the way of review.

For a child who needs concepts reviewed thoroughly and drilled consistently this is problematic. This would be one of my biggest complaints about the program. All my kids who used Teaching Textbooks in the younger grades still struggle with their math facts. My children who used Saxon (which we learned to love in later years) have a more solid math foundation.

Minimal Teacher Involvement: This program was designed for kids to use on their own. If you want to be involved in your child’s math lessons this is probably not the best curriculum.

teaching textbooks math curriculum

Low Test Scores: This is my biggest problem with Teaching Textbooks. My daughter starting using this program since Algebra 1, after using several different curriculum from K-8. She scored high on all her Teaching Textbooks tests and has an A average for math over the past four years.

This year she took the ACT and the College Placement Test and scored poorly on the math sections of both tests. Now, part of the low score was because she did not prep for the test (my fault, she only had two weeks notice). But she aced the language sections of both tests, receiving a perfect on one of them. This tells me she knows how to take a standardized test.

The disconnect comes at this point. Why would a child who has made all A’s on the Teaching Textbook’s tests for four years score below average on standardized tests? I researched this a bit on the internet and it seems to be happening to more than a few kids who have used the high school level curriculum.

Part of the problem seems to be Teaching Textbook’s method of teaching, they aren’t teaching to the test, which to me is a good thing. But, when you have a child who needs good, above average test scores because they want to go to college, this is a bad thing.

After spending another 5 years teaching homeschool math (since writing this review) I’ve come to a another conclusion about why I believe Teaching Textbooks failed my daughter in regards to test prep and why I ultimately switched to Saxon math and used it for the last several years.

One of the benefits of homeschooling is that kids can work at their own pace. Teaching Textbooks is no different, it allows kids to go back and correct their answers and there isn’t much focus on math drills. During standardized tests, children are timed and must solve problems quickly, and math facts must be memorized in order to complete all the problems during the allotted time. For our family, Saxon had a better mix of review, timed tests, and general problems than any other curriculum we used.

I do not think Teaching Textbooks is a bad math curriculum, but because of the testing issue I did not use it for any of my other kids when they got to high school. Up to Pre-Algebra I think the lessons are adequate, but beginning in Algebra 1, this curriculum is probably not the best choice for our family. If you have your heart set on Teaching Textbooks, I would recommend a significant time investment in college test prep before taking any standardized test. For me, I would rather spend the money on a curriculum that builds that into the lessons. When you have a child taking 7 to 8 credit hours, working, and participating in extra-curricular activities, there isn’t much time left for frequent test prep.

So, while I loved Teaching Textbooks, I’m disappointed with the test scores. I’d love to hear your feedback on Teaching Textbooks at the high school grade levels. If you’ve used it, has your child scored well on the ACT/SAT/CPT or have their test scores contradicted the scores received on the Teaching Textbooks tests?

Editor’s note: Math is not my daughter’s strongest subject, but before using Teaching Textbooks she always scored above the 85 percentile in math on the standardized tests.

UPDATE: As you know, not every curriculum is perfect for every family.  While I explained above why I’m not 100% sold on this curriculum, my managing editor and friend, Linda, loves Teaching Textbooks and wrote a review here explaining her position.

The post Teaching Textbooks: Curriculum Review appeared first on The Happy Housewife™ :: Home Schooling.

   

This post may contain a link to an affiliate. See my disclosure policy for more information.

Teaching Textbooks: Curriculum Review

My husband discovered Teaching Textbooks at a homeschool convention many years ago. Frustrated with teaching math I saw it as a way out. Before Teaching Textbooks I had used Bob Jones, Abeka, Horizons, Miquon, Rod and Staff, Life of Fred (see Life of Fred review here), and Chalkdust, Saxon. Some might call me a homeschool math expert since I’ve used most of the curriculum published for homeschoolers, but in reality I was desperate for something that worked for my family. Except for Saxon, which sent my kids into hysterics every single day, the other programs were all good and I liked them. But I had a problem. I was homeschooling four or five kids at the time and I needed to find a subject they could do on their own, Teaching Textbooks might be the answer to my math problem.  Teaching textbooks math curriculum review Before Teaching Textbooks, as my children progressed through the higher levels of math they would go through the book on their own and I would check their work. Inevitably they would come to a point (usually around lesson 75) where they didn’t understand the concept being taught and I would then spend two to three hours looking through all the previous lessons to help explain the current lesson they couldn’t understand. This was frustrating for my kids and for me! When I heard about Teaching Textbooks it seemed too good to be true. The lessons were on CD’s and for some levels everything was automated including the grade book. I was finished teaching math FOREVER!!! Or so I thought. Over the past four years I’ve used Math 3 Math 5Math 7, Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry, and Pre-Calculus. If you are doing the math you’ll know that I’ve spent a lot of money on this curriculum.

Pros of Teaching Textbooks Math Curriculum 

Minimal Teacher Involvement: I think this is a positive because you can follow along with your child, but it is not necessary. In the four years I’ve been using this program I’ve probably spent less than 4 hours helping my kids with math. Since I was looking for a hands-off approach to math this definitely worked. Teaching Textbook Lessons are Easy to Understand: The lessons are presented in an easy to understand way, especially at the younger levels. The teacher speaks slowly and the graphics are interesting but not overwhelming. Favorite for Kids: My kids and many others love Teaching Textbooks. My younger boys ask to do math every day because they enjoy it. After years of crying through math lessons it is nice to have a program my kids actually like. Computerized Grading: For all grades and math levels, Teaching Textbooks offers the entire program on CD rom and is totally automated, including automatic grading as soon as the child answers the question. The program tracks your child’s progress, lets you know which problems they missed, and even keeps a grade book. This makes record keeping for math very simple. NonConsumable: There are no workbooks, so more than one child can use the curriculum. Even the computer programs can be reset so siblings can use them. Excellent Customer Support: I haven’t needed customer support too often, but I’ve been impressed with their prompt responses and willingness to help. They Sell Single Copies of the Cd’s: If you have a careless child who gets into a fight with his brother and in the process cracks a CD in half, you only need to replace one CD, not the whole set. I wouldn’t know this from experience, of course.

Cons of Teaching Textbooks Math Curriculum

Expensive: Teaching Textbooks Math 3 is $119 while Saxon Math 3 is around $60. The price goes up and in high school are close to $200, with Pre-Calculus selling for $185.00. Because Teaching Textbooks is such a popular program used sets are hard to find and the prices are still fairly high. (To their credit, the prices have stayed the same for over six years). Fewer Review Problems: If you are familiar with Saxon (or Abeka to some extent) you know those programs incorporate a mind numbing amount of review problems. ? Teaching Textbooks offers significantly less in the way of review. For a child who needs concepts reviewed thoroughly and drilled consistently this is problematic. This would be one of my biggest complaints about the program. All my kids who used Teaching Textbooks in the younger grades still struggle with their math facts. My children who used Saxon (which we learned to love in later years) have a more solid math foundation. Minimal Teacher Involvement: This program was designed for kids to use on their own. If you want to be involved in your child’s math lessons this is probably not the best curriculum. teaching textbooks math curriculum Low Test Scores: This is my biggest problem with Teaching Textbooks. My daughter starting using this program since Algebra 1, after using several different curriculum from K-8. She scored high on all her Teaching Textbooks tests and has an A average for math over the past four years. This year she took the ACT and the College Placement Test and scored poorly on the math sections of both tests. Now, part of the low score was because she did not prep for the test (my fault, she only had two weeks notice). But she aced the language sections of both tests, receiving a perfect on one of them. This tells me she knows how to take a standardized test. The disconnect comes at this point. Why would a child who has made all A’s on the Teaching Textbook’s tests for four years score below average on standardized tests? I researched this a bit on the internet and it seems to be happening to more than a few kids who have used the high school level curriculum. Part of the problem seems to be Teaching Textbook’s method of teaching, they aren’t teaching to the test, which to me is a good thing. But, when you have a child who needs good, above average test scores because they want to go to college, this is a bad thing. After spending another 5 years teaching homeschool math (since writing this review) I’ve come to a another conclusion about why I believe Teaching Textbooks failed my daughter in regards to test prep and why I ultimately switched to Saxon math and used it for the last several years. One of the benefits of homeschooling is that kids can work at their own pace. Teaching Textbooks is no different, it allows kids to go back and correct their answers and there isn’t much focus on math drills. During standardized tests, children are timed and must solve problems quickly, and math facts must be memorized in order to complete all the problems during the allotted time. For our family, Saxon had a better mix of review, timed tests, and general problems than any other curriculum we used. I do not think Teaching Textbooks is a bad math curriculum, but because of the testing issue I did not use it for any of my other kids when they got to high school. Up to Pre-Algebra I think the lessons are adequate, but beginning in Algebra 1, this curriculum is probably not the best choice for our family. If you have your heart set on Teaching Textbooks, I would recommend a significant time investment in college test prep before taking any standardized test. For me, I would rather spend the money on a curriculum that builds that into the lessons. When you have a child taking 7 to 8 credit hours, working, and participating in extra-curricular activities, there isn’t much time left for frequent test prep. So, while I loved Teaching Textbooks, I’m disappointed with the test scores. I’d love to hear your feedback on Teaching Textbooks at the high school grade levels. If you’ve used it, has your child scored well on the ACT/SAT/CPT or have their test scores contradicted the scores received on the Teaching Textbooks tests? Editor’s note: Math is not my daughter’s strongest subject, but before using Teaching Textbooks she always scored above the 85 percentile in math on the standardized tests. UPDATE: As you know, not every curriculum is perfect for every family.  While I explained above why I’m not 100% sold on this curriculum, my managing editor and friend, Linda, loves Teaching Textbooks and wrote a review here explaining her position. The post Teaching Textbooks: Curriculum Review appeared first on The Happy Housewife™ :: Home Schooling.  

This post may contain a link to an affiliate. See my disclosure policy for more information.

Best Budget Friendly Gifts for Gardeners

I’m a big believer in getting people gifts they will use and enjoy. If you have a gardener on your Christmas gift list we’ve compiled some of our favorite gardening gifts that we use and love.

All of these gifts are affordable (under $30) and most of them are available on Amazon with free Amazon prime shipping!

top 10 budget friendly gardening gifts

Circular Hoe Hand Garden Weeding Tool

I learned about this tool a few months ago. Drag at ground level to cut weeds at the roots. Bottom is sharp and sides are dull, so you can use it near important plants and only cut weeds.

circular garden hoe for gardeners

Newspaper Pot Maker for DIY Biodegradable Seedling Starter Pots

This is a great gift for your aspiring young gardener. Make pots for your seedlings with newspaper using this small tool. (Makes a great stocking stuffer!)

newspaper pot molder for seedlings

Seeding Square: Seed Spacer to Optimize and Organize Your Vegetable Garden

Do you have a small space gardener on your Christmas list? This seedling square is the perfect gift! The template gives the perfect amount of space to all seeds and seedlings when planting a vegetable garden – based off of Square Foot Gardening spacing techniques.

seedling square- gardening template for small space gardening

Stainless Steel Cape Cod Hand Weeder

This hand weeder has a stainless steel blade and neck. The classic design of cape cod weeder makes weeding by hand easy. 

Gardening Gloves 

I love these gloves because they are breathable (hello- Florida!) and they have touch screen tips so you can answer your phone or change your playlist while you are working without taking them off!

gardening gloves that are breathable and allow you to use your touch screen phone

Indoor / Outdoor Thermometer and Hygrometer

This thermometer is so pretty I might buy one for myself. I love that it shows the humidity too, although in Florida it will probably read 90% most days of the year!

indoor outdoor metal thermometer hygrometer

Foldable Garden Seat

I never understood why people used these until I started doing yard work! Good grief, my back hurts after a day in the yard. This seat includes two tool pouches so you can keep your gardening tools handy while you are working. Folds up small for storage!

foldable gardening seat so you don't have backaches after working in the yard

Gardeners Hand Scrub

This homemade gift idea is perfect for the gardener on your list. Give them this hand scrub which works well on dirt and will help their hands stay soft and clean.

The Organic Gardener’s Handbook of Natural Pest and Disease Control

This is a great reference book for any gardener. One year we had some over achieving bugs ruin our small backyard garden. I was hesitant to use pesticides because we had small children. This book will provide natural solutions for those pesky pests and keep a garden healthy and pesticide free.

natural gardening handbook

Spin Bin Composter 

This composter is a little more expensive than the other items on the gardener gift list, but if they need a composter that is easy on the back this is definitely a great gift! (If you want a less expensive option you can always give them a DIY compost bin for around $20)

spin bin composter easy on your back

The post Best Budget Friendly Gifts for Gardeners appeared first on The Happy Housewife™ :: Home Management.

  

This post may contain a link to an affiliate. See my disclosure policy for more information.